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Three Years After Fukushima: Lessons Learned

Tickets still available for the Great Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Remembrance Event at Wing Luke Museum.

To Buy Tickets, Click Here

Tuesday, March 11, 2014, marks the third anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that hit the Tōhoku-Oki region of Japan, resulting in one of the deadliest and most destructive disasters in the country’s history. The environmental, social, and economic impacts of this historic catastrophe will be felt for decades. We have teamed up with KING 5 television news anchor Lori Matsukawa to host an event showcasing the creative works of three critically acclaimed Pacific Northwest artists who are using the power of film, music, and social media to commemorate the ongoing crisis and celebrate the resiliency of the Japanese people.

Featured artists:

Echo at Satsop, a short film by Etsuko Ichikawa, was filmed at the abandoned Satsop nuclear facility near Aberdeen, Wash. Born in Tokyo and a Seattle resident since 1993, Ichikawa was inspired by the emotional juxtaposition between ethereality and fear that she experienced while being in the Satsop cooling tower, and by the amazing acoustic property of the space, where the sound created by simply clapping one’s hands becomes an emotional experience.
A short film by Etsuko Ichikawa
Echo at Satsop is a short film by Etsuko Ichikawa and Ian Lucero

Buckman Coe, recently voted second-best unsigned band in the Vancouver (B.C.) weekly Georgia Straight’s reader’s choice contest, is a soul, folk and reggae artist whose lyrics show a keen understanding of human emotion and reflect a Zen-like calm and inner peace. Coe will perform a collection of songs including Stars Over Tokyo,” a soulful and emotional tribute to the residents of Tokyo in the aftermath of the Great Tōhoku Earthquake.

Voted second-best unsigned band in the Vancouver (B.C.) weekly Georgia Straight's reader's choice contest
Buckman Coe was voted second-best unsigned band in the Vancouver (B.C.) weekly Georgia Straight’s reader’s choice contest

Reactor, a documentary film by Canadian media activist and filmmaker Ian MacKenzie, is a meditative, deliberate, powerful half-hour glimpse into the world of post-Fukushima Japan. Choosing not to dwell on the magnitude 9.0 Tōhoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami three years ago — and the subsequent nuclear catastrophe that has supplanted Chernobyl as the worst disaster of the Atomic Age — Reactor is about the response, as the initial shock fades and long-term repercussions and a new reality permeate the nation’s consciousness.

Reactor follows Michael Stone, a Buddhist monk, and his pilgrimage to Japan in the aftermath of the Great East Japan earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown
Ian MacKenzie’s film, Reactor, follows Michael Stone, a Buddhist monk, and his pilgrimage to Japan in the aftermath of the Great East Japan earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown
WHERE: Wing Luke Museum (Tateuchi Theater), 719 S. King St., Seattle
Appetizers, refreshments, and dessert provided by City Fish in the Pike Place Market, Shen Zen Tea, Mashiko Japanese restaurant, and Pink’s Ice Cream.