Tag Archives: Natural Disaster

Children of the Tsunami

Children of the Tsunami is a powerful documentary film depicting stories of survival in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami that struck the Tohoku region of Japan on March 11, 2011; as told by 7-10 year old youth.

CHILDREN OF THE TSUNAMI from AMOS PICTURES on Vimeo

3 Years After Fukushima

March 11th, 2014, marks the 3-year anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that hit the Tohoku region of Japan producing a massive tsunami that killed over 18,000 people, caused $122B dollars of damage, and led to the eventual meltdown of three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The environmental, social, and economic impacts of this historic disaster will be felt for decades.

Join us for a special information session and screening of the documentary film REACTOR.

Produced and directed by critically acclaimed Canadian filmmaker Ian Mackenzie (OCCUPY LOVE, SACRED ECONOMICS, ONE WEEK JOB), REACTOR follows Michael Stone, a Yogi and Buddhist monk, on his inspirational pilgrimage to Japan in the aftermath of the disaster to witness firsthand how the Japanese are responding to the on-going crisis.

Official Trailer: http://http://www.reactorfilm.com  

EVENT DETAILS:

Light appetizers and refreshments provided. Special musical guest Buckman Coe. Interpretive services upon request. Seating capacity limited.

Email info [at] moontownfoundation [dot] org for more information.

Continue reading 3 Years After Fukushima

What Happened When Superstorm Sandy Hit NYC

On October 29th, 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore just northeast of Atlantic City, N.J., with a wind speed of approximately 80 mph. The storm had the worst possible trifecta of characteristics: an extremely large diameter, strong winds and high tide at landfall, which generated massive storm surge that inundated the coast from New Jersey to Connecticut.

Record surge levels were recorded in several areas of New York and New Jersey, with over 12 feet of surge in some locations. Subway tunnels flooded, airport runways flooded, power outages occurred all along the coast, natural gas lines were broken, and when it was all over, at least 650,000 homes were damaged or destroyed from the storm. On top of the estimated 72 people in the U.S. who were killed as a direct result of the storm, many more lives were lost as a result of hypothermia, house fires, vehicle accidents and other indirect causes.

This National Geographic documentary chronicles the events leading up to and immediately after Superstorm Sandy slammed into the Atlantic Seaboard.

One After Another After Another

The United States experiences more than 1,000 tornadoes a year.

While most storms are weak and occur in sparsely populated areas, recent storms have inflicted heavy casualties in more populated regions of the country. Moore, OK, Tuscaloosa, AL, and Joplin, MO are the most recent communities to suffer.

Tornado_Courtesy of Gene Robertson
Image: Gene Robertson, PDS Storm Chasers

Tornadoes form when large air masses of different temperatures collide; when cold, dry air runs into warm moist air, which rises, condenses into heavy rain, and then falls in powerful downdrafts.   These conditions occur most often in the Great Plains, where the high altitude jet stream from the west converges with warm, moist air moving north from the Gulf of Mexico, and warm, dry air from the southwest.

One week after a devastating tornado hit the southern Plains of Oklahoma; a similar weather pattern is being repeated.

Earlier today the NWS Storm Prediction Center issued a moderate to severe threat warning for thunderstorms, tornadoes, large hail, and damaging winds, Wednesday afternoon and evening for parts of the central and southern Plains, including parts of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

If you live in the areas of high risk, please be alert to changing weather conditions.  Look for the following danger signs:

  • Dark, often greenish sky
  • Large hail
  • A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
  • Loud roar, similar to a freight train.

If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to TAKE SHELTER IMMEDIATELY.

Education is key for reducing children’s risks to disasters

When disaster strikes children often suffer the most, but if we can teach them at an early age about the risks posed by natural hazards, they will have a better chance to survive and thrive in the aftermath of a disaster.

Natural hazards, such as floods, tornadoes and hurricanes, do not need to become disasters. For example, if a hurricane churns through a location where no one lives, the hurricane is just a natural hazard, not a disaster. But if people are living in the area where the hurricane makes land fall are affected and even killed by the hurricane, in this case, the hurricane becomes a disaster.

The United Nation Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has developed a series of on-line disaster simulation games designed to teach children around the world how to protect themselves from natural hazards before they can become major disasters.

Children who play the games learn how the location and the construction materials used to build houses can make a difference when disasters strike, as well as how early warning systems, evacuation plans and education can save lives.

As the future architects, mayors, doctors, and parents of the world of tomorrow, when children know what to do to reduce the impact of disasters, they will be obliged create a safer world for the generations that come after them.

How do you end a story about a day that will live forever?

Do you tell the death count of 24 or describe the estimated $2 billion damage to some 12,600 homes?

Do you reminisce about all the times you spent sitting in a musty cellar full of old people telling their own tornado ghost stories that frightened and intrigued you all at the same time?

Or do you admit that you intended to interview the mother of a dead boy but after watching 30 minutes of her agonizing struggle to condense 10 years of a good boy’s life into two minutes of network news, you retreated and gave both of you a break from tornado exhaustion?

Oklahoma’s Windswept Pain – by Sheila Bright

Hurricane Sandy Information Clearinghouse

“Hurricane Sandy” is an information clearinghouse for accurate, timely information related to Hurricane Sandy and subsequent recovery efforts.

This “Hurricane Sandy” Facebook page is an information clearinghouse for accurate, timely information related to Hurricane Sandy and subsequent recovery efforts.  Since Facebook has changed the way pages shows up in news feeds. If you want every update, you must:

1) Go to the “Hurricane Sandy” page.
2) Hover your mouse over where it says “LIKED” and click on “Add to Interests Lists”

If you do this, you will receive ALL of the posts and the Hurricane Sandy page will not be “removed” by Facebook from what shows up in your feed.