Tag Archives: New Orleans

Vanish Pearls

The African American Film Festival Releasing Movement is screening Nailah Jefferson’s critically acclaimed documentary film, Vanishing Pearls at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center on April 28th, 2014.

The film profiles the trials and tribulations of African American fisherman working to rebuild their lives, livelihoods, and communities in the aftermath of the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster.

Please stay tuned to ticket information.

Advertisements

Human Rights Advocate, Community Organizer, Journalist & Mother of Six

STORM SURGE is a visual narrative that follows the lives of five unsung heroes as they work to rebuild their livelihoods and communities in the wake of historic national disasters.

Cherri Foytlin is one of the main characters we profile in the film. Listen to her candid observations on what it’s like to live in the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina, Gustav, and Ivan, and the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Catastrophe. 

8 Years Ago Today

Courtesy of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Hurricane Katrina: Courtesy of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Hurricane Katrina was a natural disaster that some have described as biblical in scale and unprecedented as a human tragedy.

“The Storm,” as the locals call it, was the most destructive natural disaster in American history, laying waste to 90,000 square miles of land, an area the size of the United Kingdom.

Before The Storm

As the sheer size of Hurricane Katrina became clear, the National Weather Service’s New Orleans/Baton Rouge office issued an ominously worded emergency alert predicting that many areas throughout the Gulf Coast would be “uninhabitable for weeks” after “devastating damage” caused by Katrina.

Contraflow lane reversal, voluntary, and mandatory evacuations were issued for coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.  Approximately 1.2 million residents of the Gulf Coast heeded the evacuation orders, after hearing the following cryptic message, and fled their homes.

During The Storm

After making a brief initial landfall over Southeastern Louisiana, Hurricane Katrina made its final landfall near Louisiana/Mississippi state line, passing over the cities of Bay St. Louis and Waveland, Mississippi.

The Storm featured winds in excess of 120 mph and churned up a powerful 27-foot storm surge, which penetrated 6 miles inland, and in some areas up to 12 miles, along bays and rivers; killing close to 300 people and causing billions of dollars in damage to bridges, barges, boats, piers, houses and cars.  Thousands were left homeless, destitute, and entombed in mud.

Extreme weather photographers Mike Tice and Jim Reed captured harrowing video footage as the storm surge slammed in Gulfport, Mississippi and ripped through their hotel.

After The Storm

While the coastal Mississippi communities of Bay St. Louis, Biloxi, D’Iberville, Gulfport, Pass Christian, and Waveland Mississippi where completely washed off the map because of the massive storm surge, New Orleans was overwhelmed by flooding.

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff described the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as “probably the worst catastrophe, or set of catastrophes,” in the country’s history, referring to the hurricane itself plus the flooding of New Orleans.

Katrina’s storm surge caused 53 different levee breaches in greater New Orleans, submerging eighty percent of the city.  The levee breaches and the subsequent flooding were responsible for killing over 700 people.

Survivors and evacuees reported seeing dead bodies lying in city streets and floating in flooded sections of the city well into October. The advanced state of decomposition of many corpses hindered efforts by coroners to identify many of the dead.

In the days following Katrina, residents in New Orleans who “rode out the storm,” resorted to looting stores in search of food, water, and medical supplies.  While others took advantage of the situation to loot non-essential items like televisions and tennis shoes.

All told, more than 1,833 people died.  The results were tragic loss of life and human suffering on a massive scale, and an undermining of confidence in our governments’ ability to plan, prepare for, and respond to national catastrophes.

 

When Nature’s Fury and the Politics of Disaster Collide

Released in December 2012, seven years after the most expensive disaster in American history, this 95-minute documentary film gives you the round-the-clock news coverage and a comprehensive look behind the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina, human error, false media reports, political corruption, government bureaucracy, and a substandard physical infrastructure.

Using comprehensive analysis of events, hours of government audio tapes, and personal interviews, National Geographic takes viewers into the eye of Katrina to uncover the decisions and circumstances that determined the fate of the Gulf residents.

I’m Carolyn Parker: The Good, the Mad, and the Beautiful

Last night we watched a screening of Academy Award®-winning director Jonathan Demme’s documentary film, I’m Carolyn Parker: The Good, the Mad, and the Beautiful.  The film profiles Carolyn Parker, a fearless civil rights activist and resident of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, and her five-year crusade to rebuild her beloved house, her church, her community — and her life — after Hurricane Katrina.  Her courage and resiliency are inspirational.

by Jonathan Demme

Watch I’m Carolyn Parker – Trailer on PBS. See more from POV.

What would you do if you had to walk in her shoes for five years?

This inspirational portrait documentary film can be seen online at PBS through December 13, 2012.

Deja Vu in the Big Easy?

The major broadcasting networks consider shifting resources from GOP Convention in Tampa to New Orleans in advance of Hurricane Isaac’s landfall sometime late Tuesday evening or early Wednesday morning, which is ironically the 7th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Isaac could take direct aim at New Orleans, which is still struggling to fully recover from Katrina which swept across the city on August 29, 2005, killing more than 1,800 people and causing billions of dollars of damage along the coast.

“That brings a high level of anxiety to the people of New Orleans,” New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu told a news conference. “I want to tell everybody now that I believe that we will be OK,” he added.

At 5 p.m. EDT (2100 GMT) on Monday, Isaac was centered 255 miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River with top sustained winds of 70 mph and swirling northwest at 12 mph.

To date, Hurricane Isaac has killed at least 20 people and caused significant flooding and damage in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Hurricane Isaac Creates Sense of Angst on Anniversary of Katrina

Almost seven years to the date of Hurricane Katrina, the most destructive natural disaster in American history, Hurricane Isaac is expected to make landfall on the Central Gulf Coast as a Category 2 Hurricane sometime around 7pm tomorrow.

The National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb and Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant expect Isaac to drive a Storm Surge of 6-12 feet into coastal communities, presenting the first major test of regional infrastructure and disaster preparation systems since Katrina.  There are additional concerns that Isaac will bring in a black wave of tar balls from the BP oil spill.

Our production crew is en route to the Gulf Coast to cover Hurricane Isaac, the post storm recovery efforts, and the anticipated onshore flow of remnant oil.

Please continue your support for this compelling and relevant film project by clicking, here.  Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live field reports too.